A Tour of Greek Morphology: Part 24

Part twenty-four of a tour through Greek inflectional morphology to help get students thinking more systematically about the word forms they see (and maybe teach a bit of general linguistics along the way).

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The Normalisation Column in MorphGNT

Eliran Wong asked for a more detailed description of the “normalisation” column in MorphGNT so I promised him I’d write a blog post about it.

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A Tour of Greek Morphology: Part 23

Part twenty-three of a tour through Greek inflectional morphology to help get students thinking more systematically about the word forms they see (and maybe teach a bit of general linguistics along the way).

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A Tour of Greek Morphology: Part 22

Part twenty-two of a tour through Greek inflectional morphology to help get students thinking more systematically about the word forms they see (and maybe teach a bit of general linguistics along the way).

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First Impressions of John Lee’s Accents Book

John Lee’s Basics of Greek Accents was released today. Here are some first impressions.

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Conference Time

I’m off for another string of conferences, this time in Copenhagen, Chicago, and New Orleans.

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A Tour of Greek Morphology: Part 21

Part twenty-one of a tour through Greek inflectional morphology to help get students thinking more systematically about the word forms they see (and maybe teach a bit of general linguistics along the way).

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A Tour of Greek Morphology: Part 20

Part twenty of a tour through Greek inflectional morphology to help get students thinking more systematically about the word forms they see (and maybe teach a bit of general linguistics along the way).

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New Draft Morphological Tags for MorphGNT

I’ve finally done the work in translating the MorphGNT tagging system to a new proposal for initial feedback.

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Lexical Dispersion in the Greek New Testament Via Gries's DP

Measures of dispersion are interesting to apply to a corpus because they tell you whether a word is distributed across parts of the corpus as expected or concentrated more in just some parts. I thought I’d play around with Gries’s DP as a measure of dispersion on the SBLGNT lemmas.

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